CHRISTIAN BURKHARDT – THE WARM SOUNDS

CHRISTIAN BURKHARDT – THE WARM SOUNDS

Christian Burkhardt is an artist truly absorbed with the range of sonic possibilities, a producer not content with existing within the realms of House and Techno, but one that is determined to stretch its limits further with his signature sound. He is releasing on labels like Oslo, Raum…Musik, Pressure Traxx, La Pena, Deep Vibes, Cocoon and his own label CB Sessions. Burkhardt approaches music making with a strong focus on complex rhythms that not only move your body but rise above generic club music. His masterful use of technology, meshed with the warm sounds of analogue gear and over years of music production experience have tinged his production with a unique sound that other produces praise and DJs never seem to stop playing. Solely on the basis of his productions has he been invited to present the sounds of his Offenbach studio in the form of a live set on almost every continent. And those live sets are by no means just a playlist of Burkhardt hits. This melody and groove obsessed sound pioneer tweaks, layers and twists his sounds differently for every event. His success is measured best in the pleasure that he finds in making music – a feeling that may start in the club but never ends there.

Let’s move back in to the mid 90’s. Can you perhaps try to describe us your first ever rave experience?

My first club experience was 1991 when I went to a club called „House“ in my hometown Heidelberg. There was „D-Man“ – a mixture of piano- and hip-house playing. Was really big in those days. Some of that influence you can still hear in my productions.

Would you say that first rave parties were better than parties are now?

That’s always a personal point of view- sure it was big fun for me as a teenager renting a sound system, driving to the woods and doing an illegal party. Today my fun is more professional and the parties are bigger, but the little raver is still inside me.

We’ve come across your studio pictures (which looks impressive by the way). You’ve been using hardware analogue gear for years. How much would you say that software, such as Ableton, has changed your workflow? How do you challenge yourself to go out of your comfort zone when you are making music?

When I switched from Logic to Ableton I got lost for a year in the loops. Then I realized it’s not the best way for evolving my sound – now I mainly use Ableton as a recording device as I did before with Logic. “For the challenge, I’m sometimes doing: – a track with just one synth or drum box. – a track without kick, snare or hihat. – a track only with a mic. or field recordings. – a track with heavy metal samples… There are so many ways to keep it interesting.”

What have you been up to for the beginning of this year so far?

I was touring as usual in Europe and South America and in April I had one month off for time to produce my album, this was studio time only.

Explain to us the music you produce…

I have all this analogue stuff in my studio and mostly I jam arround with it! When recording I turn up the volume and it feels like a party at the studio.

And what kind of dance floor do you create?

I just want the people dance – that’s my main focus. They don’t have to scream each two minutes because of a dropdown, that’s not my style. I want a happy audience that are dancing non stop.

What will be your main projects for the rest of the year?

Touring and finishing my album until the end of the year. I will marry my girl also, this is what will be my biggest project so far!

Do you have your own philosophy about esthetics and sound? Can you share it with us?

My main approach is to sound different. Actually, there is so much of the same sounding music out there. My sound is a mixture of old school 70’s and 80’s with a lot of Hiphop/Funk/Rave samples and my analog studio gear.

https://soundcloud.com/christian-burkhardt/sets/doubledub-rmx-ep-cbs-9

If you would have to sell every piece of gear except one, which one would you keep and why?

This will not happen – I am a nice guy with a good karma rate. But in worst case scenario I would keep my modular system.

Leave us with your life and music philosophy.

Be real, don’t take yourself and the music business too serious. Have fun, enjoy life in the moment and do your own musical style, don’t be a copycat.