EATS EVERYTHING – LARGER THAN LIFE

EATS EVERYTHING – LARGER THAN LIFE

Eats Everything, aka Daniel Pearce, is at the forefront of a very rich history of talented DJ’s and Producers to come out of Bristol, England. The larger-than-life beat maker made a rapid and far-reaching impact on the electronic music scene in 2011 when the fittingly titled debut ‘Entrance Song’ was released on Catz N Dogz’ ‘Pets Recordings’ imprint, and the track went on to become championed by the likes of Carl Cox, Seth Troxler, Jamie Jones, and Pete Tong on BBC Radio 1. His mashup of Tiga vs Audion’s ‘Let’s Go Dancing’ – humorously entitled ‘Dancing (Again!)’ – was one of the biggest breakthrough hits of 2015, and he was soon spinning his own unique take on one of the most iconic underground dance records of all time, Green Velvet’s ‘Flash’. Eats Everything has since become one of the most in demand remixers in the business, proving his remix abilities by adding the Midas touch across a wide range of tracks from the likes of Fatboy Slim, Niles Rodgers, Jamie Jones, Disclosure, Four Tet, Matador and Booka Shade.

Are you still living in Bristol?

Yes I am, it’s the best. The only place I would live other than Bristol would be Ibiza. I want to live in Ibiza next summer. I’ve been coming here for a long time, got married here and stuff, so Ibiza is definitely somewhere I want to live. I want to try living in Ibiza for a year, perhaps between April to November next year. Now that I’ve got a 5 month old son who will be a year old by that time I think it would be a great place for him to have a first proper summer. If it works well then I may try and buy somewhere here and spend every summer in Ibiza and the winter in England. This has been his first holiday and he was just in the living room dancing to Sonica with my mother in law!

What’s it like being a new parent with your career? How do you manage yourself?

I’m not going to say it’s easy because it isn’t easy, it’s quite tough. It’s tougher on my wife than it is me, because she’s looking after the boy most of the time whilst I’m away. Obviously the summer is a lot harder than the winter, because in the winter I’m pretty much home all week, then away on the weekends. I’ll also be away for stints, like I’m going away to America for three weekends, which will be almost 20 days. Then when I get back I’m not playing for 16 days, so it balances out, whilst in the summer there’s no balance, you just have to play, play, play, play.

If you’re not playing, someone else is going to be playing. For example I wouldn’t say I’m at the top, but I’m at a higher level now, and that’s a dangerous place to be because if I don’t keep performing and doing the right things in the right places then there’s plenty of people behind me who can do the job I’m doing and I’ll get pushed down. I need to keep putting the work in whilst I’m in my position and take nothing for granted, because at the end of the day it’s a fickle industry and a fickle job. You could be massive one year and nothing the next.

It’s tough being away from the family but I don’t want to lose my momentum and I’m very privileged to do what I do, and in 10 years’ time I want to be at the top level with the likes of Carl Cox and Craig Richards.

Would you say you have had to compromise anything?

I’ve hardly had any studio time at all basically, but now I’ve just had my studio completely redone. They’ve completely sound proofed my room and made it state of the art, everything’s treated and I’ve got new synthesizers and everything to make it into a proper recording studio. I get back on Monday and I’ve got two whole weeks where I’m hoping to nail some tracks down and get back on track.

I’ve been touring so much, and with being a dad as well every time that I’m free I want to spend it with my family, so making music unfortunately goes by the wayside and you have to take your chances when you can. Now that my son’s a bit older and I’m going to be home a lot more I can spend two days in the studio, a couple days with the family, and play on the weekends so everything can balance out better.

How long have you been DJing for? Is it more than 21 years now?

I got my first decks on December 25th 1992, so a long time. I’m 36 now, so two thirds of my life! Besides my family I love it more than anything. I prefer it to working in the studio, it’s my favourite thing and the best thing in the world. I’m a raver. Raves are raves and are about having fun. That’s what I want Edible to be.

Would you be able to look back and select any stand out moments?

Definitely playing in Room One in fabric when I was beginning to get more popular. I played in Brighton and had a wicked night with the Dirtybird guys, which was the first time I met Justin Martin and Claude VonStroke. Then the next day we were playing at fabric, but something I had eaten the night before made me wake up at 6am feeling really sick. When driving from Brighton to London I kept having to stop at service stations to be ill. So this was my first ever gig at fabric and I had full on food poisoning!

When we eventually got to fabric I nailed loads of Imodium. Then when playing for those three and a half hours I didn’t even notice my illness at all because it was just so wicked. I was playing Room One at fabric and thinking it was insane, which I remember being really memorable.

There are so many other memorable moments though. Being asked to do the Essential Mixes, including one of my Edits Everything Essential Mix where I used all my own edits. Playing the Amnesia terrace closing on more than one occasion… for instance last weekend I played the Amnesia Closing party back to back with Seth Troxler. There really are so many [stand out moments] that everything is a career highlight, even all the smaller gigs.

A FEW YEARS AGO YOU STARTED EDIBLE RECORDS AND SINCE THEN HAVE PUT OUT A WHOLE SLEW OF RELEASES. TELL ME A LITTLE BIT ABOUT HOW THAT CAME ABOUT.

Well the reason we did it is because there’s a lot of people that I wanted to give a leg-up to. Like Lord Leopard, people who are really talented but aren’t for whatever reason aren’t getting the nod and exposure. I want to create a gang. Like Paradise has, Enter, Dirtybird, they’ve all got this crew and they’re all mates and I wanted to have that basically. I play a lot on my own. I’m part of Paradise crew, and I’m part of elrow, and Dirtybird but it’d be nice to have my own gang of people. We’d go around, we’d DJ, we’d have a laugh. It’s about having a laugh for me. It’s the most fun job in the world, I’m fucking so lucky. It’s the most fun, even now talking to you is fun.

And so with the label it was like, let’s just do it, create a gang, and have a lovely time.

AND THAT CERTAINLY SEEMS TO BE A MORE COMMON PLACE THING, IT’S NOT ABOUT BOOKING A HEADLINER IT’S ABOUT CURATING A LINEUP AND DEVELOPING A RELATIONSHIP WITH FANS…

Yeah of course. I’m all about relationships with the ravers because I’m a raver. I’m not even a raver at heart, I’m a fucking raver. For example, if you were a fly on the wall at Pete Tong’s pool party I was dancing more than anyone. Guaranteed.

SPEAKING OF THAT, YOU HAVE A BIG PERSONALITY THAT’S LOTS OF FUN. DO YOU EVER FEEL PRESSURED TO BE SOMETHING OR SOMEONE ON SOCIAL MEDIA?

I hate social media, I hate the Internet. The internet has a fucking lot to answer for. But you know what, I wouldn’t have a career without the Internet, that’s the double-edged sword with the Internet.

It’s basically ruining the world, effectively. It’s making people stupid. There’s so much information out there. It should be making people more intelligent but it’s making people fucking stupid. People believe anything that’s written down, they don’t dig and that’s it.

THERE’S CERTAINLY A LACK OF MEDIA LITERACY…

That’s exactly it, they’re not media literate at all. They call it the echo chamber effect, and I’m guilty of it. I only follow people on my Twitter that I like, so when Donald Trump became President I was like, “How the fuck is this happen?” because everyone that’s I’m following thinks 95% the same as me. But there’s a whole myriad of people who don’t think the same as me, and then I’m baffled because of the echo chamber.

YOU ALSO RECENTLY STARTED YOUR OWN RADIO SHOW…

Yes. Well I’ve had my Global Radio show for a few years, but I’ve just started my BBC Radio 1 show.

I fucking love it. I really really really love it, I didn’t think I would, but I love it. With the Radio One show it’s a proper thing. We do jokes, we’ve got this silly little thing called “Ding-Dong Pete Tong” where we say all this stupid stuff and then ask him questions and he tries to do a Bristolian accent and it’s fucking great. And yeah so a lot of work goes into making it good and funny because I’ve never been about just playing music. The music is the most important thing but I also think it’s good to have a bit of humor and stuff in there. And dance music shows don’t really have that. I put my heart and soul into every [gig] and I try to do as much as I can to make it stand out from everyone else.